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Turbo Kid – Review

 
 
Overview
 

Release Date: 28 August 2015 [USA]
 
Director: François Simard - Anouk Whissell - Yoann-Karl Whissell
 
Writer: François Simard - Anouk Whissell - Yoann-Karl Whissell
 
Cast: Munro Chambers - Laurence Leboeuf - Michael Ironside
 
Direction
 
 
 
 
 


 
Writing
 
 
 
 
 


 
Performance
 
 
 
 
 


 
Sound & Music
 
 
 
 
 


 
Cinematography
 
 
 
 
 


 
Editing
 
 
 
 
 


 
Visual Effects
 
 
 
 
 


 
Total Score
 
 
 
 
 
3.5/5


User Rating
2 total ratings

 


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Posted February 5, 2016 by

 
Full Article
 
 

Turbo Kid Review:

It’s a post-apocalyptic 1997 where water is scarce and civilization has crumbled. That’s the setting of Turbo Kid a film released in 2015 that harkens back to the plethora of 80s movies that fell into one of two genres: coming-of-age kid adventures (Monster Squad, Goonies, Explorers) or satirical post-apocalyptic (Class Of Nuke ‘Em High, Solarbabies, Hell Comes To Frog Town). Turbo Kid takes both of those usually disparate types of stories and fuses them together into something fresh and fun.

The Kid is a survivor of this hellish post-apocalyptic world who spends most of his time scavenging for food, comic books, and other random pieces of 80s and 90s nostalgia. Munro Chambers (Degrassi: The Next Generation) plays The Kid with a perfect tone that teeters between innocent and scarred. The Kid finds comfort in a comic book called Turbo Rider and pictures himself a superhero. The Kid’s glass confidence is shattered a bit when he meets Apple, a peculiar girl with a sunshine smile played by Laurence Leboeuf from Canadian cop drama 19-2. The chemistry and characterization between these two puts Turbo Kid on very solid emotional ground and gives you a pair to root for. Unlike many faux female protagonists in modern movies, Apple is very pro-active, take charge, and the kind of female character we need more of: sweet and tough.

Something (Great) that you might notice about Turbo Kid: practical gore effects. Turbo Kid not only pays homage to the weird movies of the 80s but it also takes the effects back to the old school by using squibs and bloody goo in place of the red CG sprays and cartoony dismemberments that’ve run insanely rampant in many other movies. Turbo Kid’s trio of directors François Simard, Anouk Whissell, and Yoann-Karl Whissell had an inspired vision which shines with nearly every frame. The cinematography does an excellent job of building the world, and Turbo Kid’s soundtrack is a layer of 80s synth that surrounds every scene in a warm blanket of sonic love.

Turbo Kid has two great lead characters, solid world building, really fun effects, and then adds the legendary Michael Ironside to the mix as the big bad named Zeus who rules “The Wasteland.” Zeus and his horde of crazy, Mad Max inspired minions torment people in a variety of gruesome ways, secure sources of water, and have figured out a rather macabre method of making fresh drinking water. Ironside gnaws on his scenes like they’re a thick, juicy piece of jerky making it so much fun to watch and hate him. Another thing of note too is that Ironside is an old school movie villain in that he’s wretched and doesn’t do villainous things for some deep down sympathetic reason. He just wants to be the biggest, meanest bully.

The easiest modern comparison to Turbo Kid is the Swedish short Kung Fury which has a similar lighthearted — but playfully violent — tone and 80s inspired creativity. Turbo Kid replaces the absurd, surrealist story of Kung Fury with one that is much more engaging and heart warming. If you grew up in the 80s you’ll enjoy the nostalgic love that was put into every single second of this film, particularly the Mega Man-esque weapon used by The Kid which is literally an old Nintendo Power Glove with a brand new paint job. For everyone else, Turbo Kid offers a fun and gory adventure through a post-apocalyptic world that’s definitely a break from the usual cookie-cutter movies of the mainstream.

It’s a kid’s movie if the kids are all over the age of 16 and not squeamish.

 

 

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Screen Shot 2015-06-18 at 19.02.58

Ruben R. Diaz
@RMartian
Freelance Contributor

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